Jan 30
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Founder, Alcala’s Western Wear
Luis Alcala learned how to sell things from his grandfather, who owned one of the first Ford dealerships in Mexico. Growing up in Durango Luis and his brother would each get a bag of oranges from their grandfather and have a competition to see who could sell the most.
In the 1940s, Mr. Alcala emigrated to the United States. He began his life in the U.S. as a cotton picker in Mississippi before moving north to Chicago. He would have assorted odd jobs before he was able to begin selling clothing at the legendary Maxwell Street Market*.
In 1972, he opened his first Alcala’s location on the far South Side of Chicago. The store only lasted two years because when U.S. Steel closed its local plant Mr. Alcala lost his customer base.
He would re-open at 1733 W. Chicago Avenue in 1974, a permanent fixture in Chicago’s West Town neighborhood for the next forty years. When it opened, the store sold inexpensive clothing to those living in the neighborhood, which was a mixture of Ukrainians, Poles, and Mexicans.
In 1980, the success of the John Travolta movie Urban Cowboy, led Alcala’s to designate a small section for western clothing. Sales were strong, and Mr. Alcala’s sons, who now ran the business, asked their father if they could transform the entire store into a western-focused business. He gave his consent as long as they remembered “the blue-collar worker.”
Since then Alcala’s Western Wear has became a west side landmark in Chicago, identifiable from blocks away by the fiberglass palomino rearing up on the from sign. 
Luis Alcala, who was the father of eleven children, had 33 grandchlldren, and 31 great-grandchildren, died on January 28, 2014 at the age of 92.
Sources: Chicago Sun-Times and Chicago Tribune
(Image: Alcala’s iconic horse by Bill on Flickr.)
* Maxwell Street Market was located on Chicago’s west side for about 100 years. It was a mile-long, outdoor market where you could buy nearly anything. For more on the market, read the Encyclopedia of Chicago’s entry.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Founder, Alcala’s Western Wear

Luis Alcala learned how to sell things from his grandfather, who owned one of the first Ford dealerships in Mexico. Growing up in Durango Luis and his brother would each get a bag of oranges from their grandfather and have a competition to see who could sell the most.

In the 1940s, Mr. Alcala emigrated to the United States. He began his life in the U.S. as a cotton picker in Mississippi before moving north to Chicago. He would have assorted odd jobs before he was able to begin selling clothing at the legendary Maxwell Street Market*.

In 1972, he opened his first Alcala’s location on the far South Side of Chicago. The store only lasted two years because when U.S. Steel closed its local plant Mr. Alcala lost his customer base.

He would re-open at 1733 W. Chicago Avenue in 1974, a permanent fixture in Chicago’s West Town neighborhood for the next forty years. When it opened, the store sold inexpensive clothing to those living in the neighborhood, which was a mixture of Ukrainians, Poles, and Mexicans.

In 1980, the success of the John Travolta movie Urban Cowboy, led Alcala’s to designate a small section for western clothing. Sales were strong, and Mr. Alcala’s sons, who now ran the business, asked their father if they could transform the entire store into a western-focused business. He gave his consent as long as they remembered “the blue-collar worker.”

Since then Alcala’s Western Wear has became a west side landmark in Chicago, identifiable from blocks away by the fiberglass palomino rearing up on the from sign. 

Luis Alcala, who was the father of eleven children, had 33 grandchlldren, and 31 great-grandchildren, died on January 28, 2014 at the age of 92.

Sources: Chicago Sun-Times and Chicago Tribune

(Image: Alcala’s iconic horse by Bill on Flickr.)

* Maxwell Street Market was located on Chicago’s west side for about 100 years. It was a mile-long, outdoor market where you could buy nearly anything. For more on the market, read the Encyclopedia of Chicago’s entry.


Jan 27
todaysdocument:


Thomas A. Edison’s Patent for An Improvement in Electric Lamps, 1/27/1880
From the Records of the Patent and Trademark Office

On January 27, 1880, The Patent Office granted Thomas Edison’s patent for “an Improvement in Electric Lamps” His patent was an improvement on electric lamps, not the invention of them, but because of Edison’s design changes and the materials he used—such as a carbon filament—his patent allowed for an electric lamp that was reliable, safe, and practical.
via DocsTeach

todaysdocument:

Thomas A. Edison’s Patent for An Improvement in Electric Lamps, 1/27/1880

From the Records of the Patent and Trademark Office

On January 27, 1880, The Patent Office granted Thomas Edison’s patent for “an Improvement in Electric Lamps” His patent was an improvement on electric lamps, not the invention of them, but because of Edison’s design changes and the materials he used—such as a carbon filament—his patent allowed for an electric lamp that was reliable, safe, and practical.

via DocsTeach


Sep 19
atavus:

Bruno Munari - One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats (Detail), 1944

atavus:

Bruno Munari - One Comes Home Tired From Working All Day and Find Your Seats (Detail), 1944

(via confessionsofamichaelstipe)


Sep 5

thereisnoalgebra:

crowcrow:

The Mods of London photographed by Carlotta Cardana

The ‘Mod Scene‘ is a subculture that originated in London in the late 1950s and peaked in the early to mid 1960s. The scene is still thriving these days and caught the attention of London-based photographer Carlotta Cardana. Mod Couples started as an exploration of the Mod scene as a whole and as Cardana advanced, she noticed that the pictures that were more powerful and interesting were those of couples, so she decided to focus exclusively on them. She became utterly fascinated at how the construction of identity is not only negotiated with the accepted norms of the subculture and society at large, but with one’s partner as well.

SO MANY BONERS 

Some awful jackets, but still. These kids.

(via afrormosia)


Jul 1
andrewromano:

“Asbury Park, New Jersey” by Joe Maloney (1979):

“It felt like you were inside a Bruce Springsteen song,” said Joe Maloney, of photographing the Jersey Shore during the late seventies and early eighties. His retrospective exhibition, “Asbury Park and the Jersey Shore, c. 1979,” which opened at Rick Wester Fine Art last weekend, inspires fond feelings of nostalgia for summers past, especially in light of the recent reconstruction efforts at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.
Maloney focussed on Asbury Park because it was a “distinctly working-class, nonaffluent, semi-urban, slightly run-down beach town, with a music culture and a vibrant street life.” Through a strong emphasis on polychromatic photography, he captured a place that was once brimming with life—carnival rides on the boardwalk, bikini-clad teen-agers, landscapes in saturated hues and glowing lights. Maloney’s exploration of Asbury Park was a departure from his usual subject matter of suburban landscapes, and his choice to photograph the Jersey Shore was ultimately fuelled by “the urge to discover something immediate, concrete, and candid within the artifice of the resort-town culture.

Click through. All of Maloney’s photographs are great.

andrewromano:

“Asbury Park, New Jersey” by Joe Maloney (1979):

“It felt like you were inside a Bruce Springsteen song,” said Joe Maloney, of photographing the Jersey Shore during the late seventies and early eighties. His retrospective exhibition, “Asbury Park and the Jersey Shore, c. 1979,” which opened at Rick Wester Fine Art last weekend, inspires fond feelings of nostalgia for summers past, especially in light of the recent reconstruction efforts at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.

Maloney focussed on Asbury Park because it was a “distinctly working-class, nonaffluent, semi-urban, slightly run-down beach town, with a music culture and a vibrant street life.” Through a strong emphasis on polychromatic photography, he captured a place that was once brimming with life—carnival rides on the boardwalk, bikini-clad teen-agers, landscapes in saturated hues and glowing lights. Maloney’s exploration of Asbury Park was a departure from his usual subject matter of suburban landscapes, and his choice to photograph the Jersey Shore was ultimately fuelled by “the urge to discover something immediate, concrete, and candid within the artifice of the resort-town culture.

Click through. All of Maloney’s photographs are great.


May 7

Idea

braiker:

i’m not necessarily the first to have this thought, but let’s not mock, autotune or otherwise meme-ify Charles Ramsey. just a thought. he’s not like a “character from the wire” as one paper put it. he’s a person who did something brave and spoke compellingly about it. 


Apr 24
My job means I get to do crazy things. Like help Scott Pinkmountain tell this story.

My job means I get to do crazy things. Like help Scott Pinkmountain tell this story.


Apr 3

4-a-d:

Deerhunter - ‘Monomania’ (Live on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon)

Damn. Rock is scary again. And incredible.

(via pitchfork)


Mar 27

wnycradiolab:

Bradley Campbell used some napkins to diagram the narrative structures of radio shows.

These are brilliant. Can’t wait to hear Rob Rosenthal’s discussion on this.


Mar 21

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